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Throwing Knives

Good durable 440 stainless steel knife blades are essential to practice your throwing knife skills. Make yourself a good target out of 1/2 inch plywood, corrugated cardboard, or styrofoam and learn how to become an expert knife thrower.

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Items 1 to 9 of 16 total

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Official Throwing Knives are not your ordinary kitchen knife that you just pick up and throw. They are fashioned from one solid piece of steel, with a very sharp blade on one half and dull handle side on the other, so you can get a good grip, without cutting your hand or fingers.
 
The dull grip side is used to not only grasp the knife for throwing easier, but as a balance for the sharpened blades. A balanced knife is essential to effectively throw a knife and strike your intended target.
 
Throwing knives are designed to be balanced or unbalanced, depending on the throwing technique desired. A balanced knife will sit level on a finger, which is seated directly in the center of the knife, between the sharpened edge and the dull handle. A balanced knife will be thrown by holding the blade, or the handle end, making it a more versatile weapon to practice and throw with. Since balanced knives are equal in weight on both sides, it will fly in a circular motion, which is much easier to control and strike your target. Balanced knives are normally the preferred throwing knife choice, because of its versatility and accuracy.
 
An unbalanced knife will be thrown from the lighter blade end and the trajectory wil not be as predictable, since it will not hurl in a perfect circular motion as the balanced knives do. Many people prefer the heavier handle end to create a better stick at the point of contact.
 
Throwing knives have their origins in Central Africa and are referred to as Kulbeta, Pinga or Trombash. They were fashioned with several different types of blades and used to hunt and for battle. Throwing stars come in a variety of sizes, designs and lengths, for your personal preference and throwing techniques.
 

Throwing Knife Techniques:

  • Hammer Grip - Hold the handle of your throwing knife, much like you would a hammer. You can use your thumb along the side of the blade to control your aim at your intended target. Keep your wrist stiff, bend your elbow, with the knife over your shoulder and near your ear, much like you would throw a dart. Practice the proper time to release the knife, as you cast your arm forward. Release too soon, and the knife will fly high in the air and miss your target. Release too late, and it will fling short, straight into the ground. Practice is the key here. This technique works best with unbalanced and heavier knives.
  • Pinch Grip - Hold the knife from the blade end between your thumb and index finger, making the knife horizontal to your extended arm. Use the same arm motion as with the hammer grip. Bend your elbow and keep the knife over your shoulder much like throwing a dart. Then arc your arm forward and practice letting go of the knife at the proper time. This technique will work best with lighter knives and balanced knives.
  • Stance -Stand on your dominant leg, with your other leg extended a step in front of you, bearing no weight. Extend your dominant throwing arm, with the knife place firmly in your hand. Bend your elbow, so the knife will be over your shoulder, close to your ear, but not too close, so as to cut yourself when your decide to throw it.
  • Casting The Knife - As you begin to quickly bring your arm forward, shift your weight on your legs from the dominant leg to the non-dominant leg. Swing your arm forward in a straight motion, releasing the knife as you do so. With practice, you will find the perfect time to release and the strength needed to hit your target.
  • Clean The Blade - Always collect your knives and clean them thoroughly before putting them away. Wash off any dirt or sap that may have collected on the blades. Then wipe them down carefully with a soft cloth covered in a light oil, to prevent rusting. Try and keep your fingers off the blades, since the oils from your hands can also stick and damage the steel blades over time.

Always be careful when handling any sharp object, but especially so with Throwing Knives, as the blades are thinner, which makes them extra sharp. Follow all safety protocols and remember throwing knives are not toys and should not be handled by unsupervised youngsters.

Use protective eye gear and a pair of leather gloves to avoid cuts and scrapes. Keep everyone back from the striking zone, until all knives have been thrown and there is no danger of accidentally hitting someone. Do not throw knives at trees, as this may not only damage the tree, but the blade could strike and ricochet back at you or someone in the area. Always keep a first aid kit nearby.

Have fun as you learn a new skill, which can be used as hunting tool, or for self defense from a distance.